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PDF Hollywood Independents: The Postwar Talent Takeover (Commerce and Mass Culture)

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Coming soon. Hollywood Independents explores the period from to when independent film producers first became key components of the modern corporate entertainment industry.

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Denise Mann examines the impact of the radically changed filmmaking climate—the decline of the studios, the rise of television, and the rise of potent talent agencies—on a group of prominent talent-turned-producers, including Burt Lancaster, Elia Kazan, and Billy Wilder. Hollywood Independents is a significant and needed contribution to the study of the left in Hollywood during the s.


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Denise Mann brilliantly engages in close analyses of key films to reveal how both cultural and institutional factors shape their production. Hollywood Independents explores the crucial period from to when independent film producers first became key components of the modern corporate entertainment industry. Denise Mann examines the impact of the radically changed filmmaking climate—the decline of the studios, the rise of television, and the rise of potent talent agencies like MCA—on a group of prominent talent-turned-producers, including Burt Lancaster, Joseph Mankiewicz, Elia Kazan, and Billy Wilder.

In order to show how these newly independent filmmakers negotiated through an increasingly fraught, reactionary creative atmosphere, Mann analyzes the reflexive portraits of their altered working conditions in such films as A Face in the Crowd , Sweet Smell of Success , and Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? These artists, she shows, took on the corporate middle managers at television networks and talent agencies as a way of challenging the status quo without risking censorship or blacklisting.

This period saw the evolution of film production from the studio-governed system to one of entrepreneurs. They cover two broad themes. First, the role of business culture in determining commercial success Read more. This book makes a timely contribution to a broader methodological project as the first systematic examination and explication of qualitative research methods within sports studies. Qualitative Methods in Sports Studies assesses a variety of approaches, ranging from social historical, media text, and personal narrative to ethnographic and interview-based qualitative research methodologies.

The effect promised audiences spectacle and a semblance of realism.

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Producer William Perlberg makes the case:. Clarity of pictures and size of screen are increasingly taxing the abilities of our art directors to provide believable exterior settings…When it comes to making Paris on the back lot, our trick bag is falling apart at the seams. The responsibility to prepare consumers and critics to appreciate foreign locations then fell to publicists and studio promotions departments.

Keeping an ear to the ground, unit publicists could convert the challenges and intricacies of location work into promotional material, which proved especially useful in selling foreign productions. Based in the Italian capital, Gold and Hill helped oversee the editorial department of The Rome Daily American while working as stringers for various publications. From the late s through the s, the popular press, the film trades and professional publications were filled with news articles and profiles of productions shooting overseas.

In the late s, occasional columns emerged from Madrid and Tokyo as well.

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The publication of these dispatches not only marked the emergence of these regions as key production centers for Hollywood companies, but they also indicated that the very act of shooting in a foreign country was news itself. The American Society of Cinematographers ASC , the publisher of the magazine, treated foreign production as both a swashbuckling experience and a creative hurdle that the Hollywood director of photography triumphed over through competence, professionalism and technical know-how. For example, cinematographer Charles G.

These pieces fell in line with the strategies of promotional campaigns by playing up the feat of filmmaking to boost the worth of motion pictures. At a time when the foreign market was making up for dwindling US audiences, Hollywood producers and publicists boosted their efforts to attract film viewers overseas. Now when a Hollywood company with publicity-generating stars came to a foreign locale, the local press took great interest in these films, churning out stories and photo spreads for a foreign public hungry for a taste of Hollywood glamour in its native land.

The French press covered the Warner Bros. Both Paris Match and Jours de France carried lengthy photo spreads of the actors performing and cavorting in the port of Marseilles. As Giuliana Muscio has demonstrated, Italian film publications offered dedicated coverage of both Hollywood productions in Italy and Hollywood movie stars in general. Wilkerson even picked up on the story, noting:.

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S… forming a pedestal of public anticipation that will sell a lot of tickets when the film finally is exhibited. Central to this phase of the campaign was the pressbook. By highlighting foreign scenery, studio press departments shaped the way that exhibitors publicized the films to audiences. The article describes:.


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  • They seem to have found the secret to good living. Even though the ads relied on the proven appeal of movie stars and images of lust and romance, they stressed foreign locations. Films shot in European cities were regularly pitched as urban tours. Gay, Alluring. Masking a Strange Adventure! Through pithy taglines, these ads evoked the technical challenges and feats that press and professional accounts also conveyed. Two years in the making!

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    All of it actually filmed in the Fiji Islands! For example, a sequence in a trailer for Three Coins in the Fountain Jean Negulesco, , the first CinemaScope film to be shot in Italy, plays like a travelogue as images and voice-over demonstrate how the widescreen format renders St. DeMille speaks from a library set and relates that the film was shot in the actual Egyptian locations where Moses once walked.

    He traces the path of both production and prophet on a map of the Sinai Peninsula, moving from the Land of Goshen to Mount Sinai, thereby imbuing the production with an aura of religious significance. In the late s, when studios such as Disney had proven the success of using sneak peeks into new movies and the filmmaking process on its show Disneyland , other film companies saw the value of promoting theatrical releases with behind-the-scenes footage.